Fujifilm APS-C is Dead? Nikon Z5, Sony A7III, Canon R6 vs the Fujifilm X Series Art of Balance

High End APS-C vs Entrly Leve Full Frame

First off let me say this:

I am a fan of competition. I want camera manufacturers to fight for customers, to work hard, to squeeze new tech into cameras as much and fast as possible for the most affordable price they can.

Hence, the more sub $2,000 full frame cameras hit the market, the more I am happy, that also Fujifilm ASP-C shooters like myself will profit from it in the long term, as this will push Fujifilm to work harder than ever.

So, I personally welcome the brand new Nikon Z5, the Sony A7III, the Canon EOS RP and also the Canon EOS R6.

But there is something I do not understand…

I blog on FujiRumors since almost a decade now, and over all these years, I have heard many times announcements of the death of the Fujifilm X series since the launch of the original Sony A7. And the same “Fujifilm APS-C is dead” voices come back today, after the announcement of the Nikon Z5.

Now, let’s look at a few facts:

  • after many years of death proclamations and multiple full frame mirrorless cameras, Fujifilm X is still here
  • not only “we are still here“, but even in times of COVID-19, Fujifilm is the only brand, that didn’t see a massive sales decrease (report here)
  • until 2018, in terms of worldwide mirrorless market share, Fujifilm came third very close to Canon, far ahead of Olympus, Nikon and Panasonic (report here)

So here is the thing: either customers are stupid, or they see it the same way as these industry insiders (DPReview included), who claim that APS-C is the sweet spot.

To be clear: the Nikon Z5, Sony A7III, Canon EOS RP and the Canon EOS R6 are all very nice cameras.

But there is one thing, that sets Fujifilm X apart from all those “entry level” full frame cameras: it can squeeze so much tech into sub $2,000 cameras, that other brands can not.

Or, in other words: their main selling point (full frame), becomes their main limitation, since if you want to deliver full frame cameras under $2,000, you have to cut costs on other sides.

Let me explain.

Entry Level Full Frame vs High End APS-C

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Fujifilm X-T3 Wins 2019 DPR Popularity Ranking, X-T30 is 4th, and Nobody Cares About DSLRs

 

Recently DPReview updated its buying guide for 2019, and decided that the 2018 Fujifilm X-T3 is simply still the best camera you can buy for under $1,500.

Now DPR looked as the most “clicked” cameras on their database in 2019.

For that information, we went to the raw data. What we’ve come up with is a list of the year’s ten most popular cameras (released at any time) based on product page views within 2019

Guess what? Yep, the Fujifilm X-T3 comes out on top!

DPR writes about the Fujifilm X-T3:

Now we know: the most popular camera among DPReview readers in 2019… wasn’t released in 2019. But there’s no doubt in our minds why the X-T3 continues to enjoy such popularity – it’s a really, really nice camera. As we said in our own review, it’s a camera that does both still photography and video exceptionally well, but maybe just as importantly it’s a camera that’s very enjoyable to use.

The camera that so many of you wanted to read more about is one that we’ve got a sweet spot for too, which suggests that Fujifilm understands its target audience: deeply nerdy photographers. We’ll raise our 70-200mm replica coffee mugs to that.

On the 4th position we find the Fujifilm X-T30:

Announced on Valentine’s Day (awww…) the X-T30 was well-positioned from the start to capture the hearts (awww…) and minds of the photography community. It brings much of what we all love about the X-T3 into a cheaper, lighter body. Plain and simple, it’s a lot of camera for under $900, and our readership clearly saw a lot to like in it too.

Here are the top 10:

  1. Fujifilm X-T3
  2. Sony a6400
  3. Sony a7 III
  4. Fujifilm X-T30
  5. Canon EOS RP
  6. Sony a6000
  7. Nikon Z6
  8. Canon EOS M50
  9. Nikon D850
  10. Canon PowerShot G7 X Mark III

The top 4 are Sony and Fujifilm, with the X-T3 on top. Astonishing 6th position for the 2014 Sony A6000. The interest in DSLR is basically dead, with only 1 camera making the ranking, the Nikon D850.

You can read the full article at dpreview.

Fujifilm X-T3 vs Canon EOS RP: Which Camera Will Save Your Butt if you Underexpose an Image?

Fujifilm X-T3

After his Canon vs Fujifilm colors comparison, Andrew has now published his full Fujifilm X-T3 vs Canon EOS RP comparison.

Yep, once again, Full Frame vs APS-C… and we find out, that sensor size is not all that matters.

Also sensor technology is important. Canon has its own sensors, which are great in many ways (ie dual pixel AF), but have one shortcoming: they are not iso-less (or iso-invariant) as Sony sensors are (which are used by Fujifilm).

Here is a summary of the video (full video below):

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Fujifilm X-T20 vs Canon EOS RP Comparison

Now that the Canon RP has leaked, apotelyt has added it to its database.

We don’t think it makes sense to compare the Canon RP to the Fujifilm X-T3, since the more affordable Fujifilm X-T3, plays in another league when it comes to video and stills specifications.

It makes more sense to compare the Canon RP to the Fujifilm X-T20.

And actually it would make even more sense to compare it to the upcoming Fujifilm X-T30, but for that comparison we have to wait until February 14.

I list what Apotelyt writes below, but at the end I add a few notes.

Arguments in favor of the Canon EOS RP:

  • More detail: Offers more megapixels (26.2 vs 24MP) with a 5% higher linear resolution.
  • Better moiré control: Has an anti-alias filter to avoid artificial patterns to appear in images.
  • Better image quality: Features a larger and more technologically advanced imaging sensor.
  • Richer colors: Larger sensor generates images with better, more accurate colors.
  • More dynamic range: Capable of capturing a wider spectrum of light and dark details.
  • Better low-light sensitivity: Can be used in poorly lit environments and still produce good images.
  • Better sound control: Has a headphone port that enables audio monitoring while recording.
  • More flexible LCD: Has swivel screen for odd-angle shots in portrait or landscape orientation.
  • More selfie-friendly: Has an articulated screen that can be turned to be front-facing.
  • Faster shutter: Has higher mechanical shutter speed (8000/sec vs 4000/sec) to freeze action.
  • Faster data transfer: Supports a more advanced USB protocol (3.1 vs 2.0).
  • Easier wireless transfer: Supports Bluetooth for image sharing without cables.
  • More modern: Reflects 2 years of technical progress since the X-T20 launch.

Advantages of the Fujifilm X-T20:

  • Maximized detail: Lacks an anti-alias filter to exploit the sensor’s full resolution potential.
  • Faster burst: Shoots at higher frequency (8 vs 5 flaps/sec) to capture the decisive moment.
  • More compact: Is smaller (118x83mm vs 133x85mm) and will fit more readily into a bag.
  • Less heavy: Has a lower weight (by 102g or 21 percent) and is thus easier to take along.
  • Easier fill-in: Has a small integrated flash to brighten shadows of backlit subjects.
  • More affordable: Was introduced into a lower priced category (44 percent cheaper at launch).
  • More heavily discounted: Has been around for much longer (launched in January 2017).

We don’t really agree with this list completely, since the Canon EOS RP has only 2 more megapixel over the X-T20, but has an anti-aliasing filter, which means it won’t have more details than the X-T20. And given the X-Trans array, it also won’t control moirè better.

Also, colors have more to do with the processor, rather than the sensor, hence we can’t really say the Canon EOS RP has “richer colors” due to the sensor.

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