Fujifilm GFX50R Discontinued, Zero Rumors About GFX50RII and Dreams About GFX100R

It’s over.

According to reports at digitalcameraworld, the Fujifilm GFX50R is now discontinued.

As a huge Fujifilm X-E line lover, the Fujifilm GFX50R would have been my most natural step into Fujifilm medium format.

However, as I don’t switch from X-Trans APS-C to Full Frame because the difference is negligible (and with lots of advantages on the APS-C side, too), I also thought that sure, going from 26 to 50 MP is OK, but at this point I prefer to go all-in and grab a 100 megapixel medium format Fujifilm GFX100S.

If there was a Fujifilm GFX100R, I’d have grabbed that one. But it looks like all I can do is to hope that one day in the future Fujifilm will give us either a Fujifilm GFX100R or an X-T styled GFX100 (as shown in these official Fujifilm prototypes).

But don’t get me wrong.

A camera with a PSAM dial, a dedicated custom settings dial and top LCD is stupidly easy and fast to operate. The total opposite of the original GFX100, which is the only Fujifilm camera I’ve ever hold in my hands where I thought “WTF, need to grab that owners manual“.

But I can’t really fall in love with cameras that are stupidly easy to use, I prefer those who are FUN to operate. Like my X-E or X-T cameras.

So, my wish for the GFX future are a GFX100R and GFX100T. But so far, I have absolutely zero rumors about it. And for the records, I have also zero rumors about a Fujifilm GFX50RII.

In any case, if you are also attracted by the rangefinder styled medium format Fujifilm cameras, then better grab yours now, as who knows for how long we will find the Fujifilm GFX50R in stock now that it is discontinued.

Good bye, Fujifilm GFX50R. I was one of the very first people to touch you, back then, at the photokina 2018, where I even illegally smuggled into the fair one day ahead of its official launch to meet you. May your heritage continue to live in the GFX lineup.

Latest Gear:

The GFX 50 Series is an ISO-less Classic

The sensor in the GFX 50 series is certainly not the fastest. Nevertheless, you should not underestimate this ISO-invariant classic with its 50 megapixels. In terms of sharpness and dynamic range, it can still hold a candle to newer developments.

by Rico Pfirstinger

Virtually all cameras of the Fujifilm X series are ISO-less (also known as ISO-invariant). This refers to cameras with sensors for which the ISO setting doesn’t matter in terms of image quality. Only the set aperture and exposure time (shutter speed) are decisive. It’s all about the actual amount of light that reaches the sensor. I have written about this before (German version, English version).

Is My Camera ISO-less?

You can find out yourself to what extent the sensor in your camera is ISO-less. Here’s an example with a GFX 50S: I first shot a consistently lit test subject at f/13, 1/50 sec. and ISO 1600. The result was a correctly exposed image. I then shot the same subject again at aperture 13 and 1/50 sec., but this time I reset the ISO to ISO 100. This is the base ISO value of the GFX 50 series, i.e. its baseline sensitivity. Of course, the second image appears four stops darker. After all, it was taken at an ISO setting that was four stops lower than the first shot, with otherwise the same exposure. To make our second image (captured at ISO 100) appear as bright as the first, we need to boost it four stops in the RAW converter (in our case, that’s Adobe Lightroom). This we do by moving the converter’s exposure slider 4 EV to the right from its zero position.

The same subject shot twice with f/13 and 1/50 sec. – on the left with ISO 1600, on the right with ISO 100 and a subsequent brightening in the RAW converter by 4 EV.

Please click on the image for a larger version.

To better assess whether the GFX 50S used in this example really works ISO-less, let’s take a closer look at enlarged details of the two test shots:

** CLICK HERE to Read the Rest of the Article **

AtomOS Firmware 10.67 brings Fujifilm GFX100/S ProRes RAW White Balance and ISO Adjustment in Final Cut Pro

It was one of the big complaints of the DPRTV guys: when you shoot in ProRes RAW on your Fujifilm GFX100/S camera, you won’t be able to adjust white balance afterwards in Final Cut Pro.

This has now been solved with AtomOS firwmare 10.67.

Ninja V & Ninja V+ AtomOS 10.67 Firmware update
Users can now benefit from White Balance and ISO/Exposure Offset adjustments for Sony’s FX9 + FX6 & Fujifilm’s GFX100 + GFX100S cameras within Final Cut Pro.

Down below you can find the release notes and download links.

The GFX Community

Follow FujiRumors: Facebook, Flipboard, Instagram, RSS-feed, Youtube and Twitter

RELEASE NOTES

** CLICK HERE to Read the Rest of the Article **

The Upcoming $500 (kit price) GF Zoom Lens is Going to Fix the True Anomaly in the GFX system

There is No Life in Perfection, or the Missing GF Glass

I once read a sentence of a buddhist monk, who said: “the too pure water does not contain any fish“.

Obviously the monk was referring to life, which can’t be lived fully if we pretend to live it in perfection and purity. If lived fully, then life is going to get “dirty” or “not perfect” sometimes.

So what has this to do with photography?

Exclusive Group for GFX Lovers

Well, let’s apply this wisdom to a much more profane subject: camera gear. And let’s say “the too perfect system does not contain customers.” And “customers” are what keeps a system alive.

And now to the point of this article.

In the ZP productions video we recently shared, ZP says that when Fujifilm launched the GFX system a few years ago, it had sheer perfect lenses. But he noticed that with the latest lens releases (GF80mmF1.7), Fujifilm traded in a bit of that perfection to release less perfect, smaller and more affordable lens.

He compares the GF110mmF2 to the GF80mmF1.7, the first one being expressions of Fuji’s perfection, the second one, while still being excellent and he actually totally loves to shoot with it, just not being just as perfect as the GF110mmF2.

Now, I get the point that ZP makes, but I can’t share his worry that Fujifilm is giving up on perfection.

In fact, I believe that so far the real anomaly in the GF lens lineup was that Fujifilm focused solely on perfection!

But if the GFX systems wants to survive, then it needs to offer a bit of everything, the absolutely perfect lenses, but also smaller, lighter and more affordable lenses. It’s this balance that will guarantee the success to Fujifilm and what will bring more and more new customers to the GFX system.

$500 GF Zoom – BRILLIANT MOVE

I am totally convinced that the upcoming $500 GF zoom lens (kit price) is a brilliant move!

Small, light, slower, affordable, but perfect for casual shooting and travel photography, while probably retaining the 102+MP resolving power.

The $500 GF zoom coupled with new affordable GF bodies has the potential to bring so many new customers to the system, that the GFX system as a whole will immensely profit from it, and Fujifilm will have more resources to develop more of those “prefect” lenses and high end bodies.

This is why I totally support Fujifilm’s move, and quite frankly I am tempted to buy the new zoom too. If I can have a versatile and small lens for my hiking tours in the Dolomites or to bring with on my travels, then that’s perfect for my needs.

In good light, the new GF zoom will be an excellent performer. And if you are like me, meaning once the sun settles down you put your camera on a tripod anyway to take your landscape shots at base ISO, little it matters if it is a slow lens. I rarely take handheld landscape images in low light anyway.

If Fujifilm wants more fish to swim in the GFX waters, then they have to give up on the proud goal of building up an optically 100% perfect and pure system with astronomical specs, and give us less perfect lenses, too.

Less perfect means also affordable, portable and compact, and that’s what the GFX system needs.

The GFX Community

Follow FujiRumors on Patreon, Facebook, Instagram, RSS-feed, Youtube, Flipboard and Twitter

The Fastest Growing Fujifilm Group

Fujifilm Managers Optimism: Potential GFX Customers Number Overwhelmingly Increasing, X-S10 Attracting Young New Customers, 5G and More

The Japanese website phileweb published an interview with Fujifilm managers.

They talk about the momentum the Fujifilm GFX series is experiencing, about the harsh COVID-19 situation, the introduction of the Fujifilm X-S10, the possibilities 5G might offer and more.

Overall, they seem very confident and positive about the future of their imaging division.

Worth to note is the part of the interview, where Fujifilm explains they find it a pity that people just store their images on their phones, and that they try to find ways to motivate people to print.

Once again, statements like these denote the huge photographic culture Fujifilm carries in their DNA, which among the others translates also into a wide variety of ergonomically different cameras that are crafted to be fun to use for different types of photographers.

I feel that for Fujifilm, photography is more than just getting hyperbolic specs on paper. It’s also, and mainly, about cultivating and incentivize our passion and fun for photography.

Down below you’ll find everything summed up, including some parts that I leave exactly like google translated it.

** CLICK HERE to Read the Rest of the Article **