Fujifilm X-T3 vs Nikon Z6 vs Z7 vs Fujifilm GFX 50R vs 50S vs X-H1 vs X-T2 – The Complete SPECS & SIZE Comparison

Fujifilm Vs. Nikon Mirrorless

The Nikon Z6 and Nikon Z7 have been announced and are now available for pre-order.

So how do Nikon’s new mirrorless cameras compare to Fujifilm’s offering?

Well, I have created a comprehensive specs comparison, and included also the Fujifilm X-T3 and Fujifilm GFX 50R to the list.

While we know a lot about the Fujifilm X-T3 and I can already insert lots of specs in the list, we know not so much about the GFX 50R. However, it should have about the same specs of the GFX 50S, just in another form factor (rangefinder) and for a much cheaper price. So there won’t be big surprises with the GFX 50R.

Both Nikon’s are surely very good cameras. There are many specs to love, but also some, that might not really incentivize Nikon DSLR shooters to switch to Nikon mirrorless Z6 or Z7.

In fact, both cameras have:

  • only 1 XQD card slot (might be a dealbreaker for Pros)
  • battery life is around 310/330 shots (welcome to mirrorless, Nikon)
  • there is no eye-detection AF (let’s hope it comes via firmware update)

But as said, Nikon did lots of other things right. Check out the Nikon Z6 specs at BH and Nikon Z7 specs at BH.

Down below you can find the complete Nikon Z6/7 Vs. Fujifilm X-T3, X-T2, X-H1, GFX 50R and GFX50S comparison. If you prefer, download the PDF comparison file form our dropbox.

Also, Camerasize has now the Nikon Z6 and Nikon Z7 in their database. You can compare it to all the cameras you want at camerasize here. The Fujifilm GFX 50S vs Nikon Z comparisons can be found at photosku.

Don’t miss the X-T3 Live Blogging and follow us on Facebook, RSS-feed, Instagram and Twitter and to allow push notifications (click bell icon on the bottom right of your browser).

have a fantastic day :)

NOTE: I notice that all our Fujifilm X-T3 rumors keep up getting copied (even the wrong ones ;) ). This means that despite constant shitstorms on FR, they trust and love us. Hence, I send them back some love ?. Just don’t forget to quote fujirumors.com ;)

Which Fujifilm Camera Should You Buy – FREE 140 Pages Fujifilm Buying Guide (3rd Edition)

Fujifilm Buying Guide

So, which Fujifilm X or G series camera should you buy?

Fujifilm Australia wants to help us to make this decision, and has just update its comprehensive Fujifilm Buying Guide, which is now in it’s 3rd edition and 140 pages strong.

If you are interested in the FUJIFILM range but don’t know where to start due to the overwhelming amount of equipment, then this ebook is for you.

Sadly the chapter “Fujifilm X-E3” is still missing ;)

You can download the PDF here or go to Fujifilm Australia Website for download.

Fujifilm GFX 50S Studio Fashion Shoot

Zack Arias and Billy Luong - CES 2014

Zack Arias and Billy Luong – CES 2014

Back to the Future

  • guest post by Chris Dodkin – dodkin.com
  • to see the original size of the images, just click on the image

GUEST POST FEATURE
Write Your Articles Directly On FujiRumors!

I first heard about the GFX on 8th January, 2014, when I met these two gentlemen at CES in Las Vegas [see image on top].

Zack is an editorial music photographer based in Atlanta, GA, and a Fuji X System Photographer, and Billy is a Manager for the Product and Marketing Specialist Group – ‎FUJIFILM CANADA INC., and one of the ‘Fuji Guys’ on YouTube.

We met at the Fujifilm stand at the Consumer Electronics Show, with Zack and I both pestering Billy to get a sneak peak of the new, unannounced, Fuji X-T1 camera.

With our sneak-peeks arranged, the conversation turned to ‘what’s next’, and Zack expressed a strong desire for Fuji to look at jumping the legacy 35mm format completely, and for them to take a look at producing a Medium Format mirrorless camera.

Billy was excited by the idea, and we began to discuss the features that the new camera should have.

Zack was all about a MF sensor as the starting point, and Billy suggested that this could then be used to shoot multiple aspect ratios, native in camera.

The camera needed to be mirrorless, to keep size, weight, and cost down, and should undercut the established MF market leaders by a significant margin.

We discussed super-sizing the successful Fuji X-Pro1, to make a digital version of the Fuji 6×9 120 ‘Texas Leica’ Film cameras, and building a more conventionally styled model, with the same accessible controls and styling, to make the camera easy and fun to use.

The Fuji engineers on the stand were excited. I left the show with a strong impression that this was something they wanted to make happen.

I posted about Fuji’s logic of jumping to MF a few times on DPR, with mixed reactions. Most people didn’t believe it would ever happen. Many 35mm format users did’t get it, and still don’t. Fuji see it makes the best economic sense, and takes them past the limitations of the 35mm format market place.

The Present

** CLICK HERE to Read the Rest of the Article **

Fringer’s Smart Adapter Contax 645 80/2 on Fujifilm GFX50s AutoFocus Demo :: Fujifilm X100F and X-T20 Reviews and More (miXed zone)

Fujifilm GFX

Fujifilm GFX 50s: BHphoto, Adorama, AmazonUS
Fujinon GF 110mm F2: USA: BHphoto, AmazonUS, Adorama Europe: WexUK, PCHstore
Fujinon GF 23mm F4USA BHphoto, AmazonUS, Adorama Europe: WexUK, PCHstore

Fujifilm X100F
BHphoto, Adorama, AmazonUS

  • The X100F — The Little Camera That Could! at fujifilm-x
  • Fuji X100F – A Street Photography Review at streetbounty

Fujifilm X-T20
BHphoto, Adorama, AmazonUS

Fujifilm X-T2
BHphoto / AmazonUS / Adorama

Fujifilm Factory Tour: Manufacturing Our Beloved Fujifilm Gear (GFX, X-T2, X-mount lenses, MK lenses more)

Manufacturing our beloved Fujifilm Gear

Manufacturing our beloved Fujifilm Gear

Fujifilm Factory Tour: Manufacturing Our Beloved X-gear :)

Hey guys,

A kind FR-reader (thanks) dropped me the link to a nice read for the weekend.

But before I share it, just allow me say a quick (but big) “thank you” to all FR-readers, who share with FR the interesting Fuji-stuff they find on the web.

You make it possible that FujiRumors is always the first to break the news and rumor, and also the first to share links in live bloggings and much more. I don’t know any other way to return you guys the favor you do to me, other than keep this blog running with enthusiasm, joy and dedication.

I’m so positive, motivated and full of energy like never before. So thanks so much to everybody for your help and support :)

And now to today’s story :-)

Jon Fauer had the pleasure to visit the Fujifilm headquarters, as well as the Fujifilm factory where the new cinema MK glass and the Fujifilm X-T2, Fujifilm GFX 50s and other X-mount lenses are made.

At the end they visit the very best place of all the tour… but read further below, to discover what it is :)

The tour starts at the Fujifilm Omiya Headquarters, where Jon talks with a Fujifilm manger about the Fujifilm GFX 50s. and especially about the new Cinema MK lenses, the MK18-55mm F2.9 and MK50-130mm T2.9. As we already reported here, X-mount version of the lenses will come by the end of the year 2017.

A curiosity, why Fujifilm called their new cinema lenses “MK” lenses:

M for Movie, Manual, Mobility, Marvelous, Multiple-use! Also, perhaps it can be said that in Video you “take the shot.” In stills, you “take” a photograph. But in movies, you “make” a film. You are a film maker. So MK.”

Then they continue to the Fujifilm Taiwa Factory:

More than 1,000 people work in the vast Fujifilm Taiwa Factory, assembling X-series and GFX cameras, components and other products. A new, dedicated area has been set up for a highly skilled team to build Fujinon MK lenses.”

Regarding the MK lenses, they say:

The philosophy of the MK lenses is affordablity for independent productions. To keep the cost down and the manufacturing yield high, Fujinon has combined techniques from their experience in high-yield manufacturing (still cameras and lenses) and high-precision, high-end lens crafting. The trick seems to the their use of molded, composite lens barrels and mechanical sub-assemblies. Traditionally, these components have been milled on CNC machines from metal. Advantages of composites include speed of manufacturing, resistance to temperature variations in the field, and advanced structural possibilities.”

And what’s the best way to end a hard day visiting factories and interviewing Fujifilm managers? Right, get a good Whisky :). So the tour ends at the Nikka Whisky Miyagikyo Sendai Distillery.

Check out the whole tour at filmanddigitaltimes (4.5MB PDF – 20 Pages)

enjoy your weekend ;)
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