Fujifilm X-H2 with Stacked Sensor: What’s the Right Price for You? (But Do NOT Compare it to the New Sony A7IV)

Here is what is happening in these days.

Since the announcement of the new Sony A7IV, I am receiving lots of emails and also comments here on FujiRumors, pressing me to share more Fujifilm X-H2 rumors.

So let me say a few quick things:

First: I can share rumors only when I either have them or I have permission to share them. So if anyone out there would like to help me to put fire in the Fujifilm community with some X-H2 rumors, then feel free to contact me either via email at fujirumor@gmail.com or via PM on our social media. Also the rumor box is always there for you. If you use it, feel free to give yourself a nickname.

Second: I can confirm that the Fujifilm X-H2 price tag should not be higher and possibly be even lower than $2,500.

So is this a good price tag or is it too expensive?

Considering that the new Sony A7IV costs $2,500, one might think that the rumored Fujifilm X-H2 pricing is too close to the one of the Sony A7IV.

But here is the thing: the Fujifilm X-H2 can’t be really compared to the Sony A7IV. In fact, as Fujifilm itself proudly announced back at the Fujifilm X summit, the next generation Fujifilm cameras will feature a stacked BSI sensor. And as we know, the Sony A7IV has a non-stacked BSI sensor, basically the same technology we find in the $1,699 Fujifilm X-T4.

So you got the point: the Fujifilm X-H2 should be compared to other stacked sensor cameras, such as the Sony A9II, the Canon R3 and the Sony A1. So let’s do it now:

So you see that the other stacked sensor option out there on the market are at least 2K+ more expensive.

And if you look for 8K in a mirrorless camera, then here are your options:

So also in this case, the Fujifilm X-H2 will be at least $1,500 more affordable than competing 8K cameras.

There is no way around it: the sensor is a very expensive (if not the most expensive) component of a camera. For example, Fujifilm paid $2,000 for the older 50MP sensor in the original GFX50S). So, the smaller the sensor, the more affordable you can make the camera.

And as I wrote in a recent article called “top 10 attacks on Fujifilm that don’t make sense“, you simply can pack more specs for less money in an APS-C camera over a Full Frame camera. And this will be the case also with the Fujifilm X-H2, which offers a stacked sensor at a price full frame can’t not even nearly match.

Now keep all this in mind when, in the survey down below, I ask you what would be the right pricing according to you for the Fujifilm X-H2.

The Fujifilm X-H2 with Stacked sensor should cost...

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Fujifilm X-H2: Getting 8K for Less than $2,500 and Price Comparison with Sony A1 and Canon R5

Regarding the Fujifilm X-H2, we already told exclusively to FujiRumors readers that:

Now, I have read some comments saying that less than $2,500 is still to high for an APS-C camera.

So let’s talk about it and compare it to how much you pay to get other 8K mirrorless cameras on the market today.

With a rumored Fujifilm X-H2 price of less than $2,500, the X-H2 would end up costing about half the price of the Canon EOS R5 or even about 1/3 of the Sony A1 price.

Now, I once wrote an article giving you guys 7 reasons why full frame can’t kill APS-C, and price is one of the reasons.

In fact, if the rumored price is accurate (and I have no reasons to doubt that) the Fujifilm X-H2 will once again prove my point that full frame can only match the price of APS-C cameras by sacrificing features and specs, as we explained making some real life examples here.

I guess that’s also why DPReview, Petapixel & CO consider APS-C is the sweet spot.

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Fujifilm GFX100S “More Than Full Frame” Promo Series… and How Suddenly Sensor Size Does Not Matter Anymore for Some Youtubers ;)

Fujifilm has launched a series of promo videos called “more than full frame“.

But unlike the title might suggest, the promo videos talk less about specs, but are more on the inspirational side… and I like that for sure!

I will share all videos below, but let me add a little note first.

After the Fujifilm GFX100S was announced, I saw a few videos of big youtubers, who consistently stood behind full frame as the only real professional format (ignoring that Fuji APS-C cameras creamed off the most prestigious awards), saying basically the following things about the GFX100S.

  • having a 70% “fuller” sensor than full frame does not really make a lot of difference
  • having more pixels and a bit more dynamic range does not really make a lot of difference
  • it is more important to have passion for photography and have a system that inspires you to shoot

Sure, I can understand that some influencers, who have strong connections with brands that don’t produce medium format cameras (and are not committed to APS-C), are arguing a bit contradictory and confusing these days.

If they say sensor size does not matter, then people will ask them “so why not go with cheaper and smaller APS-C systems“, and if they say sensor size matters, then people will ask “then why not go GFX?”.

In this regard, I respect youtubers like Tony Northrup, who just consistently said that he does care about megapixel and the more megapixel he gets, the better it is for him. Or also Jared Polin, who in a video asked Fujifilm to send him a GFX100S for testing (but Jared, maybe we can schedule a call first to organize a Fuji crash course, so that you avoid flaming again that you can’t move the focus point while face detection is enabled ;)).

And what does FujiRumors say about the sensor size debate?

Simple and true: every system has its strengths.

As for hybrid cameras, I consider APS-C the ultimate sweet spot (and so do these industry insiders like Richard Butler from DPReview and Co).

There are APS-C specific advantages and also GFX specific advantages. And of course, full frame has its strengths too.

It’s just great we have all this choice and whatever people pick, it’s surely the best system for their needs.

Personally, I am very happy with my Fujifilm X system. It’s so flexible. Small lens, big lens, fast lens, compact lens, bulky camera, super compact camera, affordable, expensive, hyperbolic specs, simplicity, retro, modern… there is so much to pick from depending on needs and taste in the Fujifilm X system, that I personally do not see any need to go full frame. I’d lose more than I’d gain (for my personal needs and preferences).

If I’d add a system to my camera bag, at this point I’d just go for the very best image quality I can get (for a reasonable price), hence with a sensor that is 70% “fuller” than full frame. Especially now, where the Fujifilm GFX100S dropped for a price cheaper than the Sony A1 and a body smaller than the Panasonic S1R.

But that’s just me, my needs, my taste, and totally personal.

If you shoot full frame and say it’s the best of the best, then it surely is like this for you, and you are blessed with lots of mirrorless options, too.

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More Than Full Frame

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